Rockmelon

Rockmelon

Rockmelon

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Benefits of Eating Rockmelon

Well, the most obvious reason is that it is delicious. Pick a ripe one (it’ll smell sweet and have a brown, not green, hole where it was attached to its stem) and you’ll be rewarded with the sweetest, juiciest fruit. Part of the melon family, rockmelon is so called because of its rough skin — but there’s nothing else rough about this superstar. It peaks in Summer but is generally available year ’round in Australia thanks to the warm climate, and there’s a long list of reasons why you should be eating it. Let’s get into it!

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Benefits of Eating Rockmelon

Well, the most obvious reason is that it is delicious. Pick a ripe one (it’ll smell sweet and have a brown, not green, hole where it was attached to its stem) and you’ll be rewarded with the sweetest, juiciest fruit. Part of the melon family, rockmelon is so called because of its rough skin — but there’s nothing else rough about this superstar. It peaks in Summer but is generally available year ’round in Australia thanks to the warm climate, and there’s a long list of reasons why you should be eating it. Let’s get into it!

1. It’s packed with beta-carotene, which gives the fruit its orange colour (along with carrots, pumpkin and sweet potato). Beta-carotene is the precursor to vitamin A, so rockmelon boasts all the benefits of a vitamin A-rich food, like decreased inflammation and a lower risk of developing cancer, heart disease and cataracts in the eyes. Rockmelon has about 30 times more beta-carotene than oranges, even though it’s paler in colour.

2. It’s made up of 90 percent water, so it’s incredibly refreshing, cooling and hydrating, especially in Summer when the fruit is at its peak.

3. It’s a great source of vitamin C, which we know is essential for boosting the immune system and keeping your health in check. Vitamin C also attacks free radicals, which in turn helps in the fight against cancer and, of course, it’s a powerful anti-oxidant.

4. It’s really, really low in sugar, fat and calories. One 100g serve of rockmelon only has 5.7g of sugar, 0.1g of fat and 29 calories. Comparatively, a 100g piece of mango has 11.2g of sugar, 0.2g of fat and has 55 calories.

5. It’s full of potassium (like bananas) which rids the body of excess sodium, therefore lowering the risk of heart disease and high blood pressure.

6. It’s a great source of dietary fibre, which is surprising given its high water content. High fibre aids digestion (no constipation ’round these parts!) and fills you up, making it a health-conscious person’s best friend.

7. It’s high in folic acid, making it a great choice for pregnant women. It’s an important tool in the production of developing the extra red blood cells needed throughout pregnancy, and is one of the only known nutrients that work to prevent neural birth defects. As well as that, folic acid plays a big part in skin cell regeneration.

8. The potassium in rockmelon sends oxygen to the brain and slows the heart rate, meaning it has a calming effect.

9. It makes a perfect, fuss-free bowl. Cut it in half, fill it up with your muesli/yoghurt/berries, and enjoy!

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