Spring

  • Asian Greens

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    Asian greens include a number of varieties which derive from southeast Asia. With centuries of cultivation and culinary related uses, you will be hard pressed to discover all the ways in which to use this broad class of leafy vegetables.

  • Asparagus

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    Asparagus is a young tender shoot (spear) vegetable, emerging out from its underground root system. The flavorful spears are a favorite spring season delicacies. Their use as food was well recognized by the ancient Greeks and Romans as a prized delicacy. One of the oldest recorded vegetables, it thought to have originated along the coastal regions of eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor regions.

  • Avocados

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    Avocados are characteristically buttery yet subtly flavorful pear-shaped fruits of Central American origin. Unlike most other fruits, they feature high-fat content and carry more calories. Nonetheless, they are among the popular fruits having good nutrition profile and health benefiting properties.

  • Bananas

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    Enjoy banana fruit; nature’s energy-rich food that comes with a safety envelope! Fresh, creamy, and delicious dessert bananas are one of the cheapest and readily available fruits all year round.

  • Beans

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    Some of the health benefits of green beans include the reduced risk of heart disease and colon cancer, as well as an improved regulation of diabetes. They provide a big boost to your immune system and contributes to the elimination of harmful free radicals.

  • Beetroot

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    Beets are highly nutritious and “cardiovascular health” friendly root vegetables. Certain unique pigment antioxidants in this root and its top greens have been found to offer protection against coronary artery disease and stroke, lower cholesterol levels within the body, and have anti-aging effects.

  • Blackberries

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    Sweet, succulent blackberries are summer delicacies in the northern temperate regions. As in raspberries, they too grow on shrubs known as “brambles.” The plant is native to sub-arctic Europe and nowadays grown at commercial scale in North America, particularly in the USA, to as far as Siberia.

  • Blueberries

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    Sweet, juicy blueberries are rich in natural pro-anthocyanin pigment antioxidants. These tiny, round blue-purple berries have long been attributed to the longevity and wellness of indigenous people living around subarctic regions in the Northern hemisphere.

  • Boysenberries

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    A boysenberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family. Boysenberries are a cross between a European Raspberry (Rubus idaeus), a Common Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus), an American Dewberry (Rubus aboriginum) and a Loganberry (Rubus × loganobaccus). Boysenberries grow on low, trailing plants and are characterized by their soft feel, thin skins, and sweet-tart flavor. Mature fruits leak juice very easily and can start to perish within a few days after harvest. It is a large eight-gram fruit, with large seeds and a dark maroon color.

  • Cherries

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    Wonderfully delicious, cherry fruit is packed with full of health-benefiting nutrients and unique antioxidants. Cherries are native to Eastern Europe and Asia Minor regions.

  • Chillies

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    Chili peppers, despite their fiery hotness, are one of the very popular spices known for their medicinal and health benefiting properties. The chili is a fruit pod of the plant belonging to the nightshade family (Solanaceae), of the genus, Capsicum.

  • Cucumber

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    Ever wonder how to beat the scorching summer heat? Just remember your backyard, humble crunchy cucumber! Nonetheless, this wonderful low-calorie vegetable indeed has more nutrients to offer than just water and electrolytes.

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